Call It Out!



It’s time to call it out ladies!

Have you ever experienced racism, but didn’t say anything until after the fact? Have you ever heard a racist remark, but didn’t address it? Rather than speak up did you instead stand there in silence?

Sadly, me too! I have experienced racist remarks and racist actions first hand, but I didn’t address it. I believe it’s time we call it out!

Just like if someone was battling with a demon, we wouldn’t stand around quiet, we’d tell it what it is!

I want everyone who experiences racism, overhears racism, or is someone who is just an innocent bystander to call it out!

We can no longer be silent about this matter. We must speak up so the women that follow after us will know how to handle it.

What to Do if You Experience Racism in the Public:

This is your chance to speak up and just say, “The statement you just made was discriminatory towards minority people, so please do not say that racial remark again”. Or if you are unsure what to say, just give them a look. Sometimes a certain look is all you need.

When someone is being prejudiced, call them out on it. This will make them aware that racial statements or slurs are not acceptable in your presence. We can not change people's views or hearts, but we can protect our younger generations by calling out racism when we see it!

We must show them there are consequences for racism so our children will have it even better.

What to Do if You Experience Racism in the WorkPlace:

  1. Document with dates and details

  2. Check your employee handbook with procedure details

  3. Contact Human Resources

  4. Make a claim

  5. Follow all policies and procedures, and get outside advice if needed.

Lastly, do not be afraid to speak up about racism and discrimination. It can be a difficult situation, but with grace, we can address this issue.


I remember being in the fourth grade and a good friend of mine said “I can’t listen to N**** music”. Or when my best friend's father told her she couldn’t date “black boys”, but I was over all the time and her family loved me. Or the time as a high school student working at our local grocery store a lady told me not to touch her groceries, and only the cashier could assist her.

From fourth grade to an adult I’ve felt the sting of racism and now finally at 27 I have the courage to call it out!

Call it Out Ladies so the next generation will have it better!